California Fool’s Gold — Exploring Hancock Park

This edition of California Fool’s Gold, currently in its ninth year, is about Hancock Park, an affluent, quiet, and mostly residential neighborhood in Midtown Los Angeles that was mostly developed in the 1920s. On this exploration I was accompanied by Hancock Park resident, Gonzi, and (at the very beginning) the good folks of Walking LA.  INTRODUCTION TO HANCOCK … Continue reading California Fool’s Gold — Exploring Hancock Park

One Album Wonders: Sonic Boom’s Spectrum

The following entry originally appeared on the Amoeblog For this edition of One Album Wonders we take a listen to Sonic Boom, who released one album, Spectrum, in 1989. Sonic Boom is Peter Kember, an English musician born in Rugby in 1965. In 1982, whilst at Rugby Art College, he co-founded The Spacemen (later Spacemen 3) with Jason Pierce. After releasing … Continue reading One Album Wonders: Sonic Boom’s Spectrum

Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography’s Map to 1650 Gallery

If you don't like, have, or know how to use GPS -- or you just prefer colorful, hand-scrawled maps -- here's a big scan of a map that I did for my upcoming art show at 1650 Gallery in Echo Park. X marks the spot! Feel free to download and print your own (just don't try … Continue reading Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography’s Map to 1650 Gallery

No Enclave — Exploring Indonesian Los Angeles

Diversity has long been part of the fabric of Los Angeles and Southern California. Humans first arrived here at least 13,000 years ago and more than twenty Native American nations made their home here before the Spanish Conquest. The Spanish pueblo of Los Angeles was itself founded by people of Native, African, European, and mixed ancestries and … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Indonesian Los Angeles

One Album Wonders: Baader Meinhoff’s Baader Meinhoff

Luke Haines has released music under several names and as a part of several bands including The Auteurs, The Black Arts, Black Box Recorder, The Deverell Twins, The North Sea Scrolls, The Servants, and the One Album Wonder that is the subject of this piece, Baader Meinhof. Baader Meinhof were named after the West German … Continue reading One Album Wonders: Baader Meinhoff’s Baader Meinhoff

No Enclave — Exploring Hawaiian Los Angeles

Diversity has long been part of the fabric of Los Angeles and Southern California. Humans first arrived here at least 13,000 years ago and more than twenty Native American nations made their home here before the Spanish Conquest. The Spanish pueblo of Los Angeles was itself founded by people of Native, African, European, and mixed ancestries and … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Hawaiian Los Angeles

Mother’s Day Movies

Mary Cassatt's After the Bath (circa 1901) The American Mother's Day was invented by Anna Jarvis in 1905, when her own mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis, died. Her mother's death proved the inspiration for a holiday and by 1908 others joined her in this macabre celebration.After five years of dedication to her obsession, Mother's Day was … Continue reading Mother’s Day Movies

No Enclave — Exploring Burmese Los Angeles

In 2010, 100,200 Burmese were counted by the US census and 15% of them lived in California. What "Burmese" means is slightly more complicated than it seems. Although “Burmese” refers to any citizen of Burma/Myanmar, regardless of ethnicity, the concept is closed entwined with that country's dominant Bamar ethnic group (from whom both “Burma” and “Myanmar” are both derived). … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Burmese Los Angeles

May the Fourth — A Look at Star Bars and Deep Space Discos

The original Star Wars had a huge impact on pop culture. As a child, nothing in the film had more impact on me than the cantina scene -- and judging from the changes in dance music and imitations that followed I wasn't alone. What better occasion to reflect on the film's impact than May the … Continue reading May the Fourth — A Look at Star Bars and Deep Space Discos

Pan-Asian Metropolis — An Introduction to the Asian Pacific Islander Communities of the Southland

Diversity has long been part of the fabric of Los Angeles and Southern California. Humans first arrived here at least 13,000 years ago and more than twenty Native American nations made their home here before the Spanish Conquest. The Spanish pueblo of Los Angeles was itself founded by people of Native, African, European, and mixed ancestries and … Continue reading Pan-Asian Metropolis — An Introduction to the Asian Pacific Islander Communities of the Southland