No Enclave — Exploring Islamic Los Angeles

I’m not religious. I am curious about my fellow humans, however, and the various ways in which we attempt to understand our world. I suppose it’s partly for that reason that I’ve always been fascinated by mythology and religion. My curiosity has led me to read a few religious texts, including the Bhagavad Gita, Bible, Gospel of Thomas, Hagakure, Phrases and Philosophies … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Islamic Los Angeles

No Enclave — Exploring Brazilian Los Angeles

As of 2015, an estimated 48.4% of Angelenos were “Hispanic of any race.” The majority of Hispanic and Latino Angelenos are of Mexican heritage but the region is also well known for being home to the largest populations of Salvadorans and Guatemalans outside of their home countries. Often overlooked are the region’s smaller Latino populations, the subject of this series of … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Brazilian Los Angeles

Top 100 Los Angeles Attractions (not in Central Los Angeles or the Westside)

If you’re familiar at all with local Los Angeles clickbait generators and news aggregators you may’ve noticed that whether they’re promoting the hottest restaurants for “celeb” sightings, the hottest restaurants for “celeb” chefs, game changing brunch spots, or juiceries one has to visit before (never after) one dies, they all have one thing in common … Continue reading Top 100 Los Angeles Attractions (not in Central Los Angeles or the Westside)

Mini-Mallism — Los Angeles’s Asian Malls

I assume that for most Americans, thoughts of the mall evoke the 1980s or an earlier era, when certain classes of young teenagers longed to spend their free time eating at places like Sbarro or Orange Julius, shopping at Banana Republic or the Limited, watching Hollywood blockbusters at the multiplex, and feeding tokens to machines at … Continue reading Mini-Mallism — Los Angeles’s Asian Malls

No Enclave — Exploring Laotian Los Angeles

California has by far the largest population of Laotian-Americans of any state, 58,424 as of 2010. There are large communities in both northern and southern California, with roughly 7,120 living in the Los Angeles area. There they maintain a relatively discreet profile, reflected mostly by the presence of a handful of restaurants either specializing in … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Laotian Los Angeles

Pan-Asian Metropolis — Asian-American Musicians of Los Angeles

A comprehensive playlist of the music of Los Angeles would have to include film scores, cool jazz, surf bands, frat rock, folk-rock, Sunset Strip psychedelia, Chicano soul, country rock, hardcore punk, Paisley Underground, hair metal, gangsta rap, and G-funk. Lists of performers and bands associated with Los Angeles invariably include plenty rock groups, soul singers, and rappers — nearly all … Continue reading Pan-Asian Metropolis — Asian-American Musicians of Los Angeles

No Enclave — Exploring Hmong Los Angeles

HMONG LOS ANGELES The Hmong are a stateless people who mostly live in Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Approximately 281,000 Hmong lived in the US, as of the 2010 census, and the state with the largest population is California. While most California Hmong live in either Fresno or Sacramento Country, several thousand live in Southern California, … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Hmong Los Angeles

No Enclave — Exploring Singaporean Los Angeles

INTRODUCTION TO SINGAPORE The Republic of Singapore is an island city-state in Southeast Asia. Its entire area is just 719.1 km2, making it slightly smaller than Los Angeles’s San Gabriel Valley. However, whilst the San Gabriel Valley is home to about 1.6 million, Singapore is home to an estimated 5.5 million. The area around Los … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Singaporean Los Angeles

Pan-Asian Metropolis — Pioneering Asian-American Architects in Los Angeles

There were Asian-American architects working outside of Los Angeles. Thomas S. Rockrise (né Iwahiko Tsumanuma) joined the American Institute of Architects (AIA) in 1921, toward the end of his career. Yasuo Matsui followed in 1927. In the mid-20th century, there Asian-American architects active in other parts of the country, as well, including Edith Leong Yang, Pu Hu Shao, … Continue reading Pan-Asian Metropolis — Pioneering Asian-American Architects in Los Angeles