No Enclave — Exploring Eritrean-Los Angeles

Since the enactment of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, an estimated 800,000 to 900,000 Africans have immigrated to the US, accounting for just 3.3% of total immigration. Although Black History Month observances typically focus on native Black Americans whose ancestors came to the US by means of the Atlantic slave trade — and … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Eritrean-Los Angeles

Los Angeles Linguistics Part 1 — A Tale of Two Neighborhoods

There is a casualness and imprecision practically intrinsic to Los Angeles. It’s only in this city that I’ve encountered people who aren’t sure what neighborhood they live in. What’s more, they seem undisturbed, it’s all “Los Angeles,” after all, an abstract city where many residents are seemingly less concerned with where they actually live than where they park their cars. Business … Continue reading Los Angeles Linguistics Part 1 — A Tale of Two Neighborhoods

No Enclave — Exploring Islamic Los Angeles

I’m not religious. I am curious about my fellow humans, however, and the various ways in which we attempt to understand our world. I suppose it’s partly for that reason that I’ve always been fascinated by mythology and religion. My curiosity has led me to read a few religious texts, including the Bhagavad Gita, Bible, Gospel of Thomas, Hagakure, Phrases and Philosophies … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Islamic Los Angeles

No Enclave — Exploring Colombian Los Angeles

As of 2015, an estimated 48.4% of Angelenos were “Hispanic of any race.” The majority of Hispanic and Latino Angelenos are of Mexican heritage but the region is also well known for being home to the largest populations of Salvadorans and Guatemalans outside of their home countries. Often overlooked are the region’s smaller Latino populations, the subject of this series of No … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Colombian Los Angeles

No Enclave — Exploring Brazilian Los Angeles

As of 2015, an estimated 48.4% of Angelenos were “Hispanic of any race.” The majority of Hispanic and Latino Angelenos are of Mexican heritage but the region is also well known for being home to the largest populations of Salvadorans and Guatemalans outside of their home countries. Often overlooked are the region’s smaller Latino populations, the subject of this series of … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Brazilian Los Angeles

No Enclave — Exploring Canadian Los Angeles

Canadian-Americans are a largely overlooked minority in the vast landscape of Los Angeles‘s diversity. Los Angeles, after all, has no Little Toronto nor an Historic Canuck Town. Whereas immigrants from south of the Rio Grande are celebrated, vilified, romanticized, ignored, and pandered to; those from north of the 49th Parallel are practically invisible. To be fair, Mexican-Americans comprise … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Canadian Los Angeles

Pan-Asian Metropolis — Asian Statuary in Los Angeles

Even though I’m more “no money” than “new money,” I share the latter’s collective love of statuary. When wondering through the city or suburbs I’m pleased by the presence of garden gnomes or bodhisattva or fast food mascots. Nothing churches up a home like a yard full of tiny replicas of Michelangelo‘s David. This being Asian Pacific … Continue reading Pan-Asian Metropolis — Asian Statuary in Los Angeles

Pan-Asian Metropolis — Asian-American Murals in Los Angeles

The landscape of Los Angeles is full of murals. Occupying as they do public rather than private space, their creators have to assume at their creation that their existence is temporary. They’re rarely respected by artless taggers and once sufficiently damaged, graffiti removers usually obliterate them with their own artless paint jobs. Increasing they’re annihilated … Continue reading Pan-Asian Metropolis — Asian-American Murals in Los Angeles