Los Angeles Linguistics Part 2: Regional Differences

Most metropolitan areas — at least the ones I’m familiar with — are divided both into neighborhoods and larger, multi-neighborhood administrative divisions or regions. Paris has its arrondissements, New York City its boroughs, Busan and Seoul have gu (구), Taipei has qū (區), St. Louis and New Orleans both have wards, Mexico City has municipios, and on. Their names vary, then, but the concept is generally the … Continue reading Los Angeles Linguistics Part 2: Regional Differences

Los Angeles Linguistics Part 1 — A Tale of Two Neighborhoods

There is a casualness and imprecision practically intrinsic to Los Angeles. It’s only in this city that I’ve encountered people who aren’t sure what neighborhood they live in. What’s more, they seem undisturbed, it’s all “Los Angeles,” after all, an abstract city where many residents are seemingly less concerned with where they actually live than where they park their cars. Business … Continue reading Los Angeles Linguistics Part 1 — A Tale of Two Neighborhoods

Pan-Asian Metropolis — Pioneering Asian-American Architects in Los Angeles

There were Asian-American architects working outside of Los Angeles. Thomas S. Rockrise (né Iwahiko Tsumanuma) joined the American Institute of Architects (AIA) in 1921, toward the end of his career. Yasuo Matsui followed in 1927. In the mid-20th century, there Asian-American architects active in other parts of the country, as well, including Edith Leong Yang, Pu Hu Shao, … Continue reading Pan-Asian Metropolis — Pioneering Asian-American Architects in Los Angeles

No Enclave — Exploring Hawaiian Los Angeles

Diversity has long been part of the fabric of Los Angeles and Southern California. Humans first arrived here at least 13,000 years ago and more than twenty Native American nations made their home here before the Spanish Conquest. The Spanish pueblo of Los Angeles was itself founded by people of Native, African, European, and mixed ancestries and … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Hawaiian Los Angeles

California Fool’s Gold

I thought that it might be useful to publish an “episode guide” of my California Fool’s Gold series of explorations. When I explore a new community, I usually rely upon the vox populi which is why anyone may vote for what communities they’d like to become the subject of future articles by clicking here for Los Angeles … Continue reading California Fool’s Gold

California Fool’s Gold Episode Guide… and links to related series

I thought that it might be useful to publish an “episode guide” of my California Fool’s Gold series of explorations. When I explore a new community, I usually rely upon the vox populi which is why anyone may vote for what communities they’d like to become the subject of future articles by clicking here for Los Angeles … Continue reading California Fool’s Gold Episode Guide… and links to related series

Taste of the Mideast Side — at the Los Angeles County Store

If there are regular readers of my column here on the Amoeblog, they’ve probably seen some of the hand-drawn and hand-painted maps which I include in my series of Southland explorations I call California Fool’s Gold. Right now a series of new maps are on display at the Los Angeles County Store in East Hollywood. None, … Continue reading Taste of the Mideast Side — at the Los Angeles County Store

Nobody Drives in LA — Exploring a Section of the Old Glendale and Edendale Red Car Lines

With bicycles, buses, ferries, planes, rideshares, sidewalks, subways, taxis, and trains at Angelenos’ disposal, why would any sane person choose car-dependency? Nobody Drives in LA celebrates sense and sensibility in transportation. ***** When I first visited Los Angeles, exploring neighborhoods quickly became one of my favorite pastimes. Then unencumbered with an occupation, I spent many of my days in various … Continue reading Nobody Drives in LA — Exploring a Section of the Old Glendale and Edendale Red Car Lines