No Enclave — Exploring Brazilian Los Angeles

As of 2015, an estimated 48.4% of Angelenos were “Hispanic of any race.” The majority of Hispanic and Latino Angelenos are of Mexican heritage but the region is also well known for being home to the largest populations of Salvadorans and Guatemalans outside of their home countries. Often overlooked are the region’s smaller Latino populations, the subject of this series of … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Brazilian Los Angeles

Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography — The Google Maps

INTRODUCTION Over the years I’ve drawn maps, painted maps, and created digital maps. For the latter, I’ve most often used Google‘s My Maps program for several reasons. It’s relatively easy, looks relatively good, has pretty good functionality (e.g. links to websites and decent customization) and because Alphabet Inc. (Google’s parent company) is the fourth-largest company … Continue reading Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography — The Google Maps

Where Fools Fear to Tread — Cruising the Mediterranean aboard the Boaty Weekender

In August I went on my first cruise, Belle & Sebastian‘s Boaty Weekender. I’d never been on a cruise before. I was, at best, ambivalent about cruises. On the one hand, I have something an anthropological curiosity which in the past has compelled me to check out renaissance faires, Civil War reenactments, a Star Trek convention, … Continue reading Where Fools Fear to Tread — Cruising the Mediterranean aboard the Boaty Weekender

Pan-Asian Metropolis — Hi Duk Lee, the Father of Koreatown (1939-2019)

Hi Duk Lee (이희덕) died on 7 March at the age of 79. Two weeks passed before his death was reported on the website L.A. Taco. Only then did the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Korea Times, KTLA, NBC, and ABC run stories on the passing of this pioneer, whose name and accomplishments remain unknown to most Angelenos, including … Continue reading Pan-Asian Metropolis — Hi Duk Lee, the Father of Koreatown (1939-2019)

No Enclave — Emerging and Unofficial Ethnic Enclaves of Los Angeles

The Los Angeles metropolitan area is widely recognized for its diversity, something which is reflected in its many ethnic enclaves. Those ethnic enclaves include ones that have been officially recognized, as well as ones which have only been colloquially recognized, and they’ve risen and fallen on waves of immigration and assimilation. The earliest of Los … Continue reading No Enclave — Emerging and Unofficial Ethnic Enclaves of Los Angeles

California Fool’s Gold — Exploring Westwood

INTRODUCTION TO WESTWOOD Westwood is a neighborhood in Los Angeles’s Westside. It’s widely known for being home to the University of California, Los Angeles although locally it’s almost equally well known for its small shopping district, Westwood Village. People who’ve lived in Los Angeles longer than I are prone to speaking about Westwood with an elegiac tone normally … Continue reading California Fool’s Gold — Exploring Westwood

Where Fools Fear to Tread — A Snapshot of Mexico (Tulum, Teotihuacan & Mexico City)

In June 2016 I went to Tulum and Mexico City. Although I’d by then lived in neighboring California for 17 years, my prior experiences  in California had been limited to Baja California — namely Cabo San Lucas, Ensenada, Mexicali, Rosarito, San Felipe, and Tijuana. While I certainly didn’t expect the Yucatán or capital to closely resemble the border and resort … Continue reading Where Fools Fear to Tread — A Snapshot of Mexico (Tulum, Teotihuacan & Mexico City)

No Enclave — Exploring Chilean Los Angeles

As of 2015, an estimated 48.4% of Angelenos were “Hispanic of any race.” The majority of Hispanic and Latino Angelenos are of Mexican heritage but the region is also well known for being home to the largest populations of Salvadorans and Guatemalans outside of their home countries. Often overlooked are the region’s smaller Latino populations, the subject of this series of No … Continue reading No Enclave — Exploring Chilean Los Angeles