A History of Asian-American Cinema

INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN-AMERICAN CINEMA  Very little has been written about the involvement of Asian-Americans (and Asian-Canadians, also discussed here) in the production of film. Even though their contributions are usually overlooked, Asian-Americans have played significant roles in the formation of America’s film culture since the early 20th century. In the early silent era, before the … Continue reading A History of Asian-American Cinema

Pan-Asian Metropolis — A Guide to Asian-American Communities of the Southland

Diversity has long been part of the fabric of Los Angeles and Southern California. Humans first arrived here at least 13,000 years ago and more than twenty Native American nations made their home here before the Spanish Conquest. The Spanish pueblo of Los Angeles was itself founded by people of Native, African, European, and mixed ancestries and … Continue reading Pan-Asian Metropolis — A Guide to Asian-American Communities of the Southland

Xu DaRocha – Painter, Photographer, Chinese TV & Cinema Veteran… and Dumpling Lover

May is Asian Pacific American Heritage, an occasion I marked by seeking interviews with several Asian-American artists (like Roommate‘s Ken Lambert) and blogging about Asian neighborhoods and such… One interview I attempted to land was Chinese-American artist Xu Darocha, now giving a whole new meaning to the concept of “Asian time” by getting her responses to … Continue reading Xu DaRocha – Painter, Photographer, Chinese TV & Cinema Veteran… and Dumpling Lover

A History of Black Cinema: 1915-1969

The Lincoln Motion Picture Company In most American silent films, minorities were generally played by white actors in make-up. When actual minorities were cast, roles were generally limited. Latinos in silent films usually played greasers and bandits; Asian-Americans played waiters, tongs and laundrymen; and blacks usually played bellboys, stable hands, maids or simple buffoons. Early … Continue reading A History of Black Cinema: 1915-1969

Marking the end of an Eight Year Venture, or, My Final Post

The following entry originally appeared on the Amoeblog This is my last dispatch for the Amoeblog.   I started blogging for Amoeblog on 26 July 2007. In that time I created a few series for the Amoeblog: One Album Wonders (profiles of bands which only released one album), Brightwell’s Top 10 (my favorite tracks from the … Continue reading Marking the end of an Eight Year Venture, or, My Final Post

Red Wing and Young Deer, the First Couple of Native American Silent Film

Cast and Crew Members at Inceville in Santa Monica, circa 1915 Before the emergence of Hollywood and the studio system, moviemaking was something of a free-for-all, open to anyone that could afford it. In the US, that privileged group was almost exclusively white and male. Roles for minorities were usually crudely stereotypical, minor, and liable … Continue reading Red Wing and Young Deer, the First Couple of Native American Silent Film

Emily Ryan of Emily’s Sassy Lime — Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Interview

Emily Ryan is an artist/actress/DJ/musician who, in 1994, formed possibly the first all female Asian American rock group, Emily’s Sassy Lime, with sisters Amy and Wendy Yao. In 2002, she played James Duval‘s girlfriend in Jon Moritsugu‘s underground classic Scumrock. Eric Brightwell: Question 1: what other all Asian-American rock bands were there before Emily’s Sassy … Continue reading Emily Ryan of Emily’s Sassy Lime — Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Interview

Yellowface — Hollywood Chinese

Famed Asian-American rights activist Ngoc-Thu Thi Nguyen and I watched this documentary about depictions of Chinese in Hollywood film called … Hollywood Chinese. I love observing how Hollywood deals with all races and ethnicities. Sometimes it’s hilarious and sometimes it’s pretty appalling and then there’s the rare occasion on which it rings true, which usually … Continue reading Yellowface — Hollywood Chinese

Where Fools Fear To Tread — A Snapshot of Korea (Seoul and Busan)

 INTRODUCTION In June, Una and I went to the Philippines and Korea on vacation. Since people will invariably ask me to clarify “North or South?” the answer, is South. Perhaps I’m wrong to think that this would be obvious since I usually assume that “Korea” means “South Korea “. More than 12 million travelers annually visit Seoul … Continue reading Where Fools Fear To Tread — A Snapshot of Korea (Seoul and Busan)